Organisation

The International Metropolis Project

The International Metropolis Project is an international network of researchers, policy makers, and community groups engaged in identifying, understanding, and responding to developments in migration and diversity. Through our efforts, we encourage the production and effective communication of policy-relevant knowledge amongst decision-makers, thought leaders, and practitioners. Our network includes partners from across North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific and is growing in Africa and Latin America.

Our international conferences are the largest annual gathering of experts in the fields of migration and diversity. In addition to a comprehensive study tour program, and just under 100 workshops, our plenary programme offers access to the insights, challenges, and prescriptions of some of the world's key experts. Before the Tampere Conference in September 2013 conferences have been held in Bonn; Copenhagen; Geneva; Lisbon; Melbourne; Milan; Oslo; Ponta Delgada, Rotterdam; The Hague, Toronto, Vancouver, Vienna, Washington and Zichron Yaacov.

In addition to our conferences, the network comes together through shared research projects, publications and informal policy discussions. Exchanges of policy and research expertise is also fostered by smaller Inter-Conference Seminars and publications, including the Journal of International Migration and Integration, that showcase international research on migration and diversity.
Our efforts are governed through a Secretariat, jointly located in Ottawa and Amsterdam, as well as biannual meetings of our International Steering Committee.

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Wagtail – migratory bird

The wagtail is the provincial bird of the Tampere Region

Wagtails are small birds with long tails which they wag frequently. Wagtails are slender, often colourful, ground-feeding insectivores of open country in the Old World. They are ground nesters, laying up to six speckled eggs at a time. Among their most conspicuous behaviours is a near constant tail wagging, a trait that has given the birds their common name.

(source: Wikipedia)